China promotes bear bile as coronavirus treatment, alarming wildlife advocates

China’s National Health Commission published a list of recommended treatments, including injections that contain bear bile powder.

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At bear farms in China and Southeast Asia, bile for use in traditional medicine is extracted by inserting a catheter, syringe, or pipe into the animals’ gallbladders—an invasive and painful process. This moon bear in a holding pen at the Vietnam Bear Rescue Centre was one of more than a thousand bears rescued in 2017 from illegal bile farms in the country.

Less than a month after taking steps to permanently ban the trade and consumption of live wild animals for food, the Chinese government has recommended using Tan Re Qing, an injection containing bear bile, to treat severe and critical COVID-19 cases. It is one of a number of recommended coronavirus treatments—both traditional and Western—on a list published March 4 by China’s National Health Commission, the government body responsible for national health policy. This recommendation highlights what wildlife advocates say is a contradictory approach to wildlife: shutting down the live trade in animals for food on the one hand and promoting the trade in animal parts on the other.

Secreted by the liver and stored in the gallbladder, bile from various species of bears, including Asiatic black bears and brown bears, has been used in traditional Chinese medicine since at least the eighth century. It contains high levels of ursodeoxycholic acid, also known as ursodiol, which is clinically proven to help dissolve gallstones and treat liver disease. Ursodeoxycholic acid has been available as a synthetic drug worldwide for decades.

The World Health Organization says no cure exists for COVID-19, though some medicines, such as pain relievers and cough syrup, can treat symptomsassociated with the disease. (Read about what scientists know and don’t know about treating coronavirus.)

Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners typically use Tan Re Qing to treat bronchitis and upper respiratory infections. Clifford Steer, a professor at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, has studied the medical benefits of ursodeoxycholic acid...

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